Netherlands

Two in five workers would consider becoming teachers

Source / author: 
NOS / DutchNews
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

More people are considering switching careers to become teachers, according to a study carried out by an educational foundation. Around 40 per cent of working people interviewed said they were interested in teaching, though many said they did not want to teach full-time or for the rest of their careers.

 

The study was carried out by research agency Motivaction on behalf of Stichting Platform Bèta Techniek (PBT), an organisation set up to address the shortage of skilled teachers in science subjects such as chemistry and biology. Secondary schools are also struggling to recruit teachers for foreign languages, NOS reported.

 

Potential teachers said they valued the chance to help children and young people get the most out of their abilities. However, many were put off by the lack of opportunities the profession offered for personal development.

 

A spokesman for PBT said teachers needed to be challenged more throughout their careers and not expected to teach the same material year after year. ‘If we don’t want people to drop out of education after a while, something needs to be done. We need to have an overhaul of how we think about education; it has to become much more flexible.’
 

Bètamentality 2011-2016: Attracting Young People to Science and Technology

Source / author: 
PBT
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

More and more young people are choosing to study science, technology, engineering and mathematics (‘STEM’) both at secondary school and in higher education. As a result, the Netherlands has managed to catch up somewhat with the rest of Europe in recent years. That’s certainly a welcome development, as talented and highly educated science and technology experts have a role to play in devising sustainable solutions in the fields of energy, climate change, health and welfare, population ageing and the ever-increasing desire for mobility. However, our knowledge-driven society demands even more. The economic crisis may have prevented the labour market from shrinking for the time being, but the workforce in a number of technological sectors is ageing, which means that labour shortages are expected in the near future. For the sake of the economy and society, it therefore remains important to ensure that STEM subjects are inspiring to young people. And in order to inspire that target group, it is important to know what drives and motivates them. How exactly do they view STEM subjects?

 

The objective of Platform Bèta Techniek is to ensure a steady supply of highly-educated science and technology experts for future years. In order to achieve that objective, the Platform co-operates closely with various parties in the educational system and labour market. One of the important aspects of these efforts is to improve the image of STEM educational programmes. These programmes must remain relevant to young people. They need to target groups who might not normally choose a STEM subject, but who do have an active or passive interest in science itself. Another potentially interesting target group is young people who are good at science and technology subjects but have a negative image of the world of science and technology (the ‘SciTech world’). The underlying question is how to inspire these young people: how can we (re)introduce them to the SciTech world and STEM subjects in a positive and exciting way? And subsequently, how can we hold on to them?

 

In 2007, the Platform commissioned the survey that formed the basis for the BètaMentality model. The model helps educational institutions, business and sectors to understand how young people see STEM subjects and to adapt their approaches accordingly. The model was devised three years ago and is being used successfully by an increasing number of educational institutions, businesses and intermediary organisations.

 

In 2010, a new survey was performed with the aim of gaining broader and more in-depth knowledge of the target group. The age group of the participants was widened to 12-24 (compared with 14-18 previously) and the questions were extended to gain a greater insight into the four BètaMentality types. The new information was used to refine the model. Further insights were also gained by using BètaMentality youth panels and by linking careers to the four BètaMentality types. We hope that this publication will therefore be even more enlightening and inspiring than the first edition.

Techniekpact (Technology Pact)

Description: 

On 13 May 2013, over 60 parties signed the National Technology Pact 2020 in an effort to structurally improve alignment between education and the technology job market and reduce the shortage of technically trained staff. Since the official signing of the Technology Pact, all the involved partners have made concerted and dedicated efforts to implement the necessary measures on the basis of an integrated approach entitled ‘Choosing, learning and working in technology’. The Technology Pact is characterised by a regional approach with a national support infrastructure. 

 

As the results clearly show, the approach has proven effective and is now being emulated at international level: in the wake of Estonia and Flanders, Denmark is also set to introduce its own Technology Pact later this year.

 

The Technology Pact was updated three years after its original signing in order to evolve in pace with the inevitable social changes as a result of ongoing technological developments. A new structure has been defined on the basis of twelve objectives, offering room to continue ongoing measures from the original Technology Pact and formulate relevant new goals. The overarching ambitions for the Technology Pact 2016–2020 will remain unchanged: developing a structural approach to ensure a well-trained workforce with enough smart and capable technicians for the jobs of today and tomorrow.

 

An English version of the document can be downloaded here.

Country: 
Education level: 
Photo: 
Organisation: 
Government of the Netherlands
Impact: 

The impact of the Technology Pact and progress in regard to each of the twelve objectives is measured on a national and regional level in the Technology Pact Monitor, published yearly by the Dutch ministry of Economic Affairs and the Dutch national STEM platform (PBT). The analsyis is based on datasets of the Dutch National Statistics Agency (CBS), the Education Executive Agency of the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science (DUO), the Employee Insurance Agency (UWV) and various partners in the field. The full web-based Technology Pact Monitor can be found here. (Dutch only)

Reach: 

Each of the twelve objectives of the National Technology Pact supports a range of national and regional actions, programmes and measures through a variety of policy instruments. 

Budget and funding model: 

The Dutch National Technology Pact is supported by more than sixty partners, including national ministries, the education sectors, the Dutch regions, industry and employer organisations and labour unions. The objectives of the Technology Pact are supported by a wide variety of policy instruments (e.g. Regional Investment Fund VET). The Dutch National STEM platform is tasked with the regional coordination of the Technology Pact. In addition, the STEM platform implements various national programmes that support the objectives of the Technology Pact. 

Deltaplan: Actieplan voor de Aanpak van tekorten aan Bèta’s en Technici (Dutch only)

Source / author: 
Ministry of Education, Culture and Science
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

The Deltaplan was the national STEM strategy of the Dutch government and direct response to the Lisbon goal of increasing the number of STEM graduates by 15% by 2010 (reference year: 2000) and targets related to increased R&D spending. The Deltaplan was formally launched in 2004 and included the formation of an independent national STEM platform (Platform Bèta Techniek). Its headline target was increasing the number of STEM graduates by 15% by 2007. 

 

Dynamic & Innovative Public Private Partnerships in the Netherlands

Source / author: 
PBT
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

The world is rapidly changing; technological progress is swiftly and permanently altering our everyday lives. Globalization and technology advancement bring about permanent changes in the economy that change the structure of the labour force, and create new jobs while at the same time threaten traditional lines of work.

 

The Netherlands has an open economy which thrives on international trade. As Europe’s 7th largest economy, 5th largest foreign investor and investee, 4th largest importer, 2nd largest exporter, and leading exporter of agricultural products, the Netherlands earns 33% of its income from the export of goods and services alone.

 

To keep up with this fast track to innovation, we are constantly reconsidering our science, technology and innovation policy and encouraging dynamic collaboration between the Dutch government, the education and the business sectors.

 

To meet changing job requirements, government and private sector have joined forces to accelerate change and invest in conversion of the workforce. Dynamic partnerships were formed, referred to as Centres of Expertise (Higher Education) and Centres for lnnovative Craftsmanship (Vocational Education). This publication provides an overview of the Dutch Centres of Expertise and Centres of Innovative Craftsmanship and their approach.

Centres of Expertise

Description: 

To meet changing job requirements, government and private sector in the Netherlands have joined forces to accelerate change and invest in conversion of the workforce through the Centres of Expertise (higher education) and Centres of Innovative Craftsmanship (vocational education). The Centres are powerful action-oriented partnerships between educational institutions, companies, goverments and other public organisations. The network of Centres started in 2011 with a few pilots, and has expanded to over 150 fully operational public-private partnerships (Centres) in 2016. The main objectives of the Centres are:
 

  • Creating an excellent link between edcation and the labour market
  • Educating innovative and skilled professionals, craftsman or craftswoman
  • Promoting 'life-long learning and timely retraining
  • Accelerating and enhancing the innovation capacity of companies

 

Each Centre focuses on a specific sector (High Tech Systems & Materials, Horticulture, Life Sciences & Health, Agri & Food, Water, Energy, Chemicals, Logistics, Creative industry, ICT, Construction or Culture, Living & Welfare). On average, each centre involves 35 companies from the sector that take part in research and development projects, providing imput in the curriculum, join innovation teams and provide guest lectures. More information about the centres and methodology can be found in the English brochure.  

Country: 
Photo: 
Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

In 2016, an independent expert committee evaluated the impact of the Centre-approach. In their report they concluded that the concept is effective and efficient. The committee concluded that the Centre-concept is effective, and has a positive impact on companies, schools and the innovation system. The full audit report (Dutch only) can be found here.

Reach: 

In 2016, over 4500 companies, 83 Universities of Applied Sciences and senior secondary vocational education institutes were involved in the centres, reaching over 50.000 students and 4000 teachers. 

Budget and funding model: 

The Centres are co-funded by government and industry. With an average co-investment of businesses and organisations of more thant 65%, the total programme size in 2016 was EUR 125 million. Government investment in the programme in 2016 was EUR 45.5 million. More information about the budget, funding model and future plans can be found on the programme website.  

Quote data pages: 

Over 4500 companies invest more than 60 million euro yearly in the Dutch Centres of Expertise (higher education) and Centres for Innovative Craftsmanship (VET).

Zorgpact (Health Pact)

Description: 

The healthcare sector is rapidly changing. To ensure the best possible care for everyone, healthcare professionals should adapt to these changes continuously. Zorgpact (Health Pact) is an initiative of the Dutch government that aims to support and strenghten ‘bottom-up’ cooperation in the healthcare field via regional ‘healthcare pacts’. These pacts are action agenda’s for cooperation created by networks of healthcare providers, education institutions and local government.

 

Building on the successful Techniekpact (Technology Pact) approach, Zorgpact facilitates regional cooperation, monitors regional developments, highlights relevant themes, and boosts best practice sharing between regions. On the national level, Zorgpact supports the regions by mapping legislative barriers, thematic research (e.g. impact of technological developments) and by connecting the initiatives to relevant instruments (e.g. the Dutch regional investment fund for Vocational Education and Training) for the development of new innovative approaches and solutions.

Country: 
Photo: 
Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

Since its launch, 67 best practices have been identified and unified in a leaders group (Kopgroep). Zorgpact has also mapped (and where possible) removed 40 barriers for cooperation, and supported seven successful project proposals from the healthcare sector, in the Regional Investment Fund for Vocational Education and Training.

Reach: 

Zorgpact was launched in 2015. There are currently 16 Zorgpact-regions.

Budget and funding model: 

The Dutch government commissioned the Dutch national STEM platform to implement Zorgpact. Following the successful Technology Pact approach, Zorgpact does not subsidise any initiatives directly, but leverages and coordinates existing funding instruments to increase their impact on the regional level.

Technology Pact 2016 - 2020

Source / author: 
Government of the Netherlands
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

On 13 May 2013, over 60 parties signed the National Technology Pact 2020 in an effort to structurally improve alignment between education and the technology job market and reduce the shortage of technically trained staff. Since the official signing of the Technology Pact, all the involved partners have made concerted and dedicated efforts to implement the necessary measures on the basis of an integrated approach entitled ‘Choosing, learning and working in technology’. The Technology Pact is characterised by a regional approach with a national support infrastructure. 

 

As the results clearly show, the approach has proven effective and is now being emulated at international level: in the wake of Estonia and Flanders, Denmark is also set to introduce its own Technology Pact later this year.

 

The Technology Pact was updated three years after its original signing in order to evolve in pace with the inevitable social changes as a result of ongoing technological developments. A new structure has been defined on the basis of twelve objectives, offering room to continue ongoing measures from the original Technology Pact and formulate relevant new goals. The overarching ambitions for the Technology Pact 2016–2020 will remain unchanged: developing a structural approach to ensure a well-trained workforce with enough smart and capable technicians for the jobs of today and tomorrow.

 

An English version of the document can be downloaded here.

Techniekpact Monitor 2017 (Dutch only)

Source / author: 
PBT / Dutch ministry of Economic Affairs
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

On 13 May 2013, over 60 parties signed the National Technology Pact 2020 in an effort to structurally improve alignment between education and the technology job market and reduce the shortage of technically trained staff. Since the official signing of the Technology Pact, all the involved partners have made concerted and dedicated efforts to implement the necessary measures on the basis of an integrated approach entitled ‘Choosing, learning and working in technology’.

 

This progress is monitored in the 'Technology Pact Monitor', a yearly publication of the Dutch National STEM Platform (PBT) and the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (EZ). The publication covers the entire education chain (from primary to higher education) as well as the labour market. The analsyis is based on datasets of the Dutch National Statistics Agency (CBS), the Education Executive Agency of the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science (DUO), the Employee Insurance Agency (UWV) and various partners in the field.

 

For the first time, the Technology Pact Monitor is relaeased as a digital-only portal that allows users to filter data, and zoom in on specific regions or topics. Key trends and findings were published in an infographic. 

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