Netherlands

Deltaplan: Actieplan voor de Aanpak van tekorten aan Bèta’s en Technici (Dutch only)

Source / author: 
Ministry of Education, Culture and Science
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

The Deltaplan was the national STEM strategy of the Dutch government and direct response to the Lisbon goal of increasing the number of STEM graduates by 15% by 2010 (reference year: 2000) and targets related to increased R&D spending. The Deltaplan was formally launched in 2004 and included the formation of an independent national STEM platform (Platform Bèta Techniek). Its headline target was increasing the number of STEM graduates by 15% by 2007. 

 

Dynamic & Innovative Public Private Partnerships in the Netherlands

Source / author: 
PBT
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

The world is rapidly changing; technological progress is swiftly and permanently altering our everyday lives. Globalization and technology advancement bring about permanent changes in the economy that change the structure of the labour force, and create new jobs while at the same time threaten traditional lines of work.

 

The Netherlands has an open economy which thrives on international trade. As Europe’s 7th largest economy, 5th largest foreign investor and investee, 4th largest importer, 2nd largest exporter, and leading exporter of agricultural products, the Netherlands earns 33% of its income from the export of goods and services alone.

 

To keep up with this fast track to innovation, we are constantly reconsidering our science, technology and innovation policy and encouraging dynamic collaboration between the Dutch government, the education and the business sectors.

 

To meet changing job requirements, government and private sector have joined forces to accelerate change and invest in conversion of the workforce. Dynamic partnerships were formed, referred to as Centres of Expertise (Higher Education) and Centres for lnnovative Craftsmanship (Vocational Education). This publication provides an overview of the Dutch Centres of Expertise and Centres of Innovative Craftsmanship and their approach.

Centres of Expertise

Description: 

To meet changing job requirements, government and private sector in the Netherlands have joined forces to accelerate change and invest in conversion of the workforce through the Centres of Expertise (higher education) and Centres of Innovative Craftsmanship (vocational education). The Centres are powerful action-oriented partnerships between educational institutions, companies, goverments and other public organisations. The network of Centres started in 2011 with a few pilots, and has expanded to over 150 fully operational public-private partnerships (Centres) in 2016. The main objectives of the Centres are:

 

  • Creating an excellent link between edcation and the labour market
  • Educating innovative and skilled professionals, craftsman or craftswoman
  • Promoting 'life-long learning and timely retraining
  • Accelerating and enhancing the innovation capacity of companies
     

Each Centre focuses on a specific sector (High Tech Systems & Materials, Horticulture, Life Sciences & Health, Agri & Food, Water, Energy, Chemicals, Logistics, Creative industry, ICT, Construction or Culture, Living & Welfare). On average, each centre involves 35 companies from the sector that take part in research and development projects, providing imput in the curriculum, join innovation teams and provide guest lectures. More information about the centres and methodology can be found in the English brochure.  

Country: 
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Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

In 2016, an independent expert committee evaluated the impact of the Centre-approach. In their report they concluded that the concept is effective and efficient. The committee concluded that the Centre-concept is effective, and has a positive impact on companies, schools and the innovation system. The full audit report (Dutch only) can be found here.

Reach: 

In 2016, over 4500 companies, 83 Universities of Applied Sciences and senior secondary vocational education institutes were involved in the centres, reaching over 50.000 students and 4000 teachers. 

Budget and funding model: 

The Centres are co-funded by government and industry. With an average co-investment of businesses and organisations of more thant 65%, the total programme size in 2016 was EUR 125 million. Government investment in the programme in 2016 was EUR 45.5 million. More information about the budget, funding model and future plans can be found on the programme website.  

Zorgpact (Health Pact)

Description: 

The healthcare sector is rapidly changing. To ensure the best possible care for everyone, healthcare professionals should adapt to these changes continuously. Zorgpact (Health Pact) is an initiative of the Dutch government that aims to support and strenghten ‘bottom-up’ cooperation in the healthcare field via regional ‘healthcare pacts’. These pacts are action agenda’s for cooperation created by networks of healthcare providers, education institutions and local government.

 

Building on the successful Techniekpact (Technology Pact) approach, Zorgpact facilitates regional cooperation, monitors regional developments, highlights relevant themes, and boosts best practice sharing between regions. On the national level, Zorgpact supports the regions by mapping legislative barriers, thematic research (e.g. impact of technological developments) and by connecting the initiatives to relevant instruments (e.g. the Dutch regional investment fund for Vocational Education and Training) for the development of new innovative approaches and solutions.

Country: 
Photo: 
Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

Since its launch, 67 best practices have been identified and unified in a leaders group (Kopgroep). Zorgpact has also mapped (and where possible) removed 40 barriers for cooperation, and supported seven successful project proposals from the healthcare sector, in the Regional Investment Fund for Vocational Education and Training.

Reach: 

Zorgpact was launched in 2015. There are currently 16 Zorgpact-regions.

Budget and funding model: 

The Dutch government commissioned the Dutch national STEM platform to implement Zorgpact. Following the successful Technology Pact approach, Zorgpact does not subsidise any initiatives directly, but leverages and coordinates existing funding instruments to increase their impact on the regional level.

Technology Pact 2016 - 2020

Source / author: 
Government of the Netherlands
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

On 13 May 2013, over 60 parties signed the National Technology Pact 2020 in an effort to structurally improve alignment between education and the technology job market and reduce the shortage of technically trained staff. Since the official signing of the Technology Pact, all the involved partners have made concerted and dedicated efforts to implement the necessary measures on the basis of an integrated approach entitled ‘Choosing, learning and working in technology’. The Technology Pact is characterised by a regional approach with a national support infrastructure. 

 

As the results clearly show, the approach has proven effective and is now being emulated at international level: in the wake of Estonia and Flanders, Denmark is also set to introduce its own Technology Pact later this year.

 

The Technology Pact was updated three years after its original signing in order to evolve in pace with the inevitable social changes as a result of ongoing technological developments. A new structure has been defined on the basis of twelve objectives, offering room to continue ongoing measures from the original Technology Pact and formulate relevant new goals. The overarching ambitions for the Technology Pact 2016–2020 will remain unchanged: developing a structural approach to ensure a well-trained workforce with enough smart and capable technicians for the jobs of today and tomorrow.

 

An English version of the document can be downloaed here.

Techniekpact Monitor 2017 (Dutch only)

Source / author: 
PBT / Dutch ministry of Economic Affairs
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

On 13 May 2013, over 60 parties signed the National Technology Pact 2020 in an effort to structurally improve alignment between education and the technology job market and reduce the shortage of technically trained staff. Since the official signing of the Technology Pact, all the involved partners have made concerted and dedicated efforts to implement the necessary measures on the basis of an integrated approach entitled ‘Choosing, learning and working in technology’.

 

This progress is monitored in the 'Technology Pact Monitor', a yearly publication of the Dutch National STEM Platform (PBT) and the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (EZ). The publication covers the entire education chain (from primary to higher education) as well as the labour market. The analsyis is based on datasets of the Dutch National Statistics Agency (CBS), the Education Executive Agency of the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science (DUO), the Employee Insurance Agency (UWV) and various partners in the field.

 

For the first time, the Technology Pact Monitor is relaeased as a digital-only portal that allows users to filter data, and zoom in on specific regions or topics. Key trends and findings were published in an infographic. 

STEM Teacher Academy

Description: 

STEM Teacher Academy is a programme of the Dutch national STEM platform aimed at improving the content of STEM courses (and the way it is taught) in secondary education through cooperation with industry. The programme was launched in 2014 for a three year period and contributes to objectives set in the Dutch national Technology Pact and several government programmes aimed at reducing teacher shortages. 

 

The programme's main ambition is to provide the most up-to-date teaching tools to STEM teachers in secondary education, now and in the future. This ambition is implemented through various activities, including guest-lectures by industry professionals and short-term 'internships' for teachers in technology companies. The programme is structured to build lasting links between technology companies and classroom and builds on existing regionalised networks and programmes, including the VO-HO netwerken (pre-university secondary education) and Toptechniek in Bedrijf (VET).  

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Education level: 
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Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

The programme achieved nearly 100% geographical coverage. In addition, the programme also sparked pilots for the inclusion of company traineeships in the curriculum of  teacher training programmes in eight universities of applied science (UAS).

Reach: 

The STEM Teacher Academy programme was part of a 3-year government 'impulse', and was completed in 2017. The programme achieved near 100% coverage by realising 19 regional networks that involved 227 companies, and trained 814 STEM teachers. 

Budget and funding model: 

The STEM Teacher Academy programme was funded by government as a fixed-term 3 year programme, as part of a broader effort to reduce teacher shortages and increase the quality of teaching. Companies contributed to the programme 'in kind' (e.g. by allowing their employees time off to give guest-lectures etc.). 

Platform Bèta Techniek: A European Good Practice in Search of Exposure and Cooperation

Source / author: 
Platform Bèta Techniek
Country: 
Netherlands
Abstract: 

On November 10th and 11th 2008 The Platform Bèta Techniek (Platform Science and Technology) organised an international summit on Math, Science and Technology: The Dutch Experience in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. At this summit three objectives were addressed: The Netherlands presented The Dutch Approach toward getting more young people interested and choosing MST in Holland; the summit provided opportunities to people working in that field from different countries to connect, and the basis was laid toward a new international political agenda. At the end of the day The Platform shared their intention to present a working paper as a follow-up of this summit.

 

This working paper is aimed at the participants and other interested parties. The Platform Bèta Techniek is described first: it’s goals and strategy are described, as are the programmes, activities and the results that were obtained up till now. The chapter closes with a paragraph on what The Platform considers to be the remaining challenges for the future. Next the Platform presents its international ambitions: what added value can the Platform Bèta Techniek give to the goals and challenges Europe is facing in terms of innovating the MST education and getting more young people interested in MST careers? And what goals has the Platform set towards creating an exchange of knowledge and experience between The Netherlands and other European countries. This paper closes with an invitation to collaborate and join in deliberation in the remaining challenges.

VO-HO Netwerken

Description: 

The VO-HO Netwerken (Secondary-Higher Education Networks) were set up in 2004 as part of the Deltaplan Bèta Techniek (Dutch national STEM strategy). The main goals of the networks are the professional development of secondary education teachers and principals, the continual innovation of courses and curricula and the improvement of the connection between secondary education (VO) and higher education (HO). The networks offer a wide pallet of activities for students, teachers, technical teacher assistants and heads of schools with a focus on STEM education. Currently there are are ten regional networks that consist of universities,  higher education institutions, (pre-univeristy) secondary schools and business and societal institutions. The specific objectives are set by each regional network independently, in alignment with the regional context and objectives. 

Country: 
Education level: 
Photo: 
Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

The specific objectives of the networks are set and monitored on a regional level, and thus vary from network to network.  However, an indepedent study of the Radbout University Nijmegen on the effectivess of the networks (Raab et al, 2017) showed that in the period 2008-2010, 59.5 per cent of the overall enrollment in STEM studies (which grew over 3 times faster than total enrollment in higher education) can be attributed directly to the collaborations. The study also concluded that the VO-HO Netwerken are a highly cost-efficient policy instrument. 

Reach: 

The Networks cover of 361 (pre-university) secondary schools (60% of the total), 22 universities of applies sciences and 12 research universities. Together they reache more than 35.000 students and 3.800 teachers annually.

Budget and funding model: 

The networks are coordinated by the Dutch national STEM platform (PBT) and co-financed by the Dutch government, industry and the participating institutions. 

Jet-Net

Description: 

Jet-Net (Youth and Technology Network Netherlands) is a joint initiative of leading Dutch technology companies and secondary (pre-college) schools aimed at promoting STEM uptake through one-on-one school-company partnerships. The programme was founded by five Dutch technology companies (Shell, Philips, DSM, AkzoNobel and Unilever) in 2002 and currently involves more than 90 technology companies and 180 pre-university secondary schools (aprox. 40% of total). In collaboration with the schools, 'Jet-Net companies' develop an educational environment with practical content for the science curriculum and provide students with experiences that show that technology is challenging, meaningful and socially relevant.

 

In 2012, a Danish version of the Jet-Net programme was launched by the Danish House of Natural Sciences under the name Jet-Net.dk. The Jet-Net.dk programme grew to involve over 60 technology companies in under three years. 

Country: 
Education level: 
Photo: 
Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

STEM uptake (students opting for a one of the two STEM tracks in their fourth year) in Jet-Net schools is significantly higher than the national average (more info can be found on the Jet-Net website).

Reach: 

Between 2002 and 2016 Jet-Net has grown from 5 to 92 associated companies and from 15 to 180 schools. The Jet-Net companies invested a combined total of 6 million euros in Jet-Net programmes. At the moment 60.000 students are reached through the Jet-Net program and 300 teachers are aligned.

Budget and funding model: 

The Jet-Net programme is co-funded by government and industry. It's yearly budget for programme management is EUR 800.000 (co-funded by industry and government). Direct contributions to the programme activities from industry (in cash and in-kind) are estimated to exceed EUR 6 millon per year.

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