Competitions

European Science on Stage festivals

Description: 

Every two years, Science on Stage organises Europes biggest educational festival from and for STEM teachers. Each time hosted by a different country, the event brings together up to 450 STEM teachers from over 30 countries to share and exchange their ideas and concepts for a successful science education from primary to secondary school.

 

Every participant presents his or her good-practice teaching examples to their international colleagues at stands, in workshops and in on-stage-presentations. Following the principle 'from teachers for teachers' the festival supports the professional development of the educators. Furthermore the most innovative best-practice teaching concepts find their way to teacher trainings, brochures and teaching materials after the event.

Teachers are competitively selected to be part of their country’s delegation through rigorous application processes and national events.

 

The next European Science on Stage festival takes place from 31 October to 3 November 2019 at the Estoril Congress Center in Cascais, Portugal. 

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Organisation: 
Science on Stage Europe
Impact: 

The impact of our work can be measured by the personal benefit the teachers get through participating in our European Science on Stage festival. The results of the evaluation of the festivals demonstrate that the exchange of teachers has a positive effect on the motivation and joy in the profession. Indeed, participating teachers find many inspiring ideas for their STEM lessons and actually incorporate them practically in their own classrooms. However, the teachers do not only appreciate the exchange of inspiring ideas, but also the possibility to gain and maintain contacts made on an international basis. The improvement of science teaching and thus the promotion of students to consider a career in science, ICT and engineering, can be a good way to counteract the skilled worker shortage in these areas. (see Evaluation report)

Reach: 

The festival brings together up to 450 STEM teachers from over 30 countries to share and exchange their ideas and concepts for a successful science education from primary to secondary school. These festivals are the peak of our work – they constitute a gateway for national follow-up activities of each individual Science on Stage country. Through the festivals, newly acquired concepts find their way to teacher trainings, brochures and teaching materials in every participating country. In this way we reach more than 100,000 STEM teachers across Europe.

Budget and funding model: 

The European Science on Stage festivals are funded through private companies and foundations, municipalities, cooperation with universities and other STEM initiatives. The host country/National Steering Committee that organises the European festival is responsible for fundraising, supported by the umbrella organisation Science on Stage Europe e.V.

STEM Olympiads

Description: 

The STEM Olympiads (Olympiades de sciences de l'ingénieur) is the biggest STEM competition organised in France. During 6 months, students create technological innovations. They present their innovations to a jury, who judges the innovative aspects, the engineering approach to do it, the capacity to work in group, and the scientific developments of the research. The best projects receive a grant from different industrial partners, and are sometimes patented.

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Organisation: 
UPSTI
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Impact: 

Each year, more than 200 press articles are published. This contributes to promoting STEM beyond the students themselves (e.g. family members).

Reach: 

The goal is to make the promotion of STEM, and provide grants to the students who involve in it. Each year, 4.500 students participate to this contest.

Budget and funding model: 

The action is supported by UPSTI and its partners.

Rocket69

Description: 

"Rocket 69“ is an educational scientific entertaining TV contest for young people to show that STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) can be fun and I can do it, while offering excitement and new knowledge. The name of the show comes from the fact that on 1969 the first man stepped on the Moon.

 

All students starting from age 15 until university students from 1st or 2nd year of studies can apply for the show. 15 contestants are chosen through casting and the casting process makes up the 1st episode of the show.

 

Contestants solve the assignments in groups and from 10th episode also individually. In the end of each episode one contestant has to leave after 1:1 scientific duel. All assignments demand creativity, theoretical scientific knowledge and ability to use it in practices.

 

In the Grand Finale 2 finalists have to solve complex assignment that will show all their abilities. There is 1 personal winner who wins the 10 000€ scholarship to support his/her studies.

 

The Judging panel consists of Host of the show (young scientist) and 3 main judges who are also researchers.

 

Locations. 9 episodes are shot in a studio built for the show. Starting from 10th episode the locations vary – different science labs and research organizations, companies etc. For the Grand Finale studio will be built up again.

 

Production consists of 2 teams: TV Production Team and Science Editor Team. Science Editor and its team consist of mainly young scientists design the assignments. Together with the TV production team they prepare the assignments, to have both the scientific content and the visual attractiveness joined in the action.

 

All assignments and solutions are explained with voice-over, by graphical illustrations during the show and also commented by judges. In addition the Science Editor creates deeper explanations in web for each assignment that can be used as STEM teaching material at school. The show is supported by cross-media approach – radio, newspapers, web, Facebook and other social media channels.

 

The format of the Rocket69 has been developed in the framework of the TeaMe programme of the Estonian Research Council with co-financing from the European Social Fund, European Regional Fund and the Estonian state.

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Organisation: 
Estonian Research Council
Impact: 

It is difficult to measure the direct impact of TV-show, but we can see the signs in the society that it has had an impact.

 

At school we can see that the Assignments from TV-episodes are directly used in STEM classes or teachers get ideas for creating their own team-assignments for the classes (we do have up to 45 assignments in stock per season). Rocket69-format has become a teaching method. Rocket69 roadshows go to schools involving former participants and judges (reseachers) and Rocket69 participants have become real stars in real life.

 

And also in society – young children who are not yet in the age of entering Rocket69 keep asking will there still be the show when I grow up and tell their parents to organise their birthday parties in Rocket69 style. Last year there were these 2 random leads in our daily newspapares talking about the finals of Season 7: 

 

„It’s a very unusual show at Estonian TV landscape: they do not show psychics telling you how to find your happiness or famous people making fools of themselves. Instead you really learn something new each episode, while also getting entertained. Very rare in our media!“

 

„Rocket69 is exiting! The final of the Season 7 was like duel of cross-country skiers Thomas Wassberg and Juha Mieto at Lake Placid Olympics on 1980!“

Reach: 

The reach is very different on different Seasons (8th will start in January 2018). We could say that the average reach per episode through the Seasons has been 80-100 000 inlcuding children under 12 who are not part of the media-monitoring system.

Budget and funding model: 

The show is currently mainly funded from European Structural funds and in addition by local companies and univeristies.

StarT Finland

Description: 

StarT is the flagship programme of the LUMA Centre Finland (Finnish STEM platform). Launched in 2016, the programme's main objective is to bring science, mathematics and technology closer to children and youngsters through interdisciplinary, project-based collaborative learning. The programme is implemented by LUMA Centre Finland (network between 13 regional STEM education centre within Finnish universities) through 'learning communities', supported by collaboration partners including the Finnish National Agency for Education and companies in the field of science and technology like IBM.

 

The StarT programme is implemented on three levels:|
 

  1. Local level: kindergartens, primary schools, high schools, and extracurricular activity groups participating in StarT
     
  2. Regional level: StarT festivals organized all around Finland by the LUMA centers together with local partners (does not apply to non-Finnish participants)
     
  3. National / International level: the LUMA Centre Finland organizes the StarT Gala, where teams chosen by the StarT jury – also non-Finnish teams – are awarded
     

In these levels, the StarT programme supports project-based learning in the local learning communities, StarT festivals and a national/international StarT gala.

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Organisation: 
LUMA
Impact: 

The overall feedback has been excellent. For example, in relation to a math related learning project teachers noted that: “Children have learned to create their own ideas, to solve problems in a team, work together to overcome difficulties, associate the amount of things with numbers, improved perception of time and counting skills. During the festival they developed not only mathematical skills, but also improved their social skills.” In school year 2016-2017 support material was sent through the StarT newsletter to 500 learning communities in Finland. There were ca. 10 000 participants (kids/youth/teachers/educators) in StarT learning communities, ca. 1000 participants in regional StarT festivals and ca. 400 participant in national/international StarT Gala.

Reach: 

In the 2016-2017 school year, the StarT programme supported 400 learning communities from Finland and 350 learning communities from abroad with participants from 36 countries. 

Budget and funding model: 

StarT learning projects are carried out in learning communities like day care centres, kindergartens, schools etc. around the country and funded by themselves. Regional and national StarT marketing as well as the regional StarT festivals and national/international StarT Gala are funded by the Finnish universities and the sponsoring companies.

Jet-Net

Description: 

Jet-Net (Youth and Technology Network Netherlands) is a joint initiative of leading Dutch technology companies and secondary (pre-college) schools aimed at promoting STEM uptake through one-on-one school-company partnerships. The programme was founded by five Dutch technology companies (Shell, Philips, DSM, AkzoNobel and Unilever) in 2002 and currently involves more than 90 technology companies and 180 pre-university secondary schools (aprox. 40% of total). In collaboration with the schools, 'Jet-Net companies' develop an educational environment with practical content for the science curriculum and provide students with experiences that show that technology is challenging, meaningful and socially relevant.

 

In 2012, a Danish version of the Jet-Net programme was launched by the Danish House of Natural Sciences under the name Jet-Net.dk. The Jet-Net.dk programme grew to involve over 60 technology companies in under three years. 

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Education level: 
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Organisation: 
PBT
Impact: 

STEM uptake (students opting for a one of the two STEM tracks in their fourth year) in Jet-Net schools is significantly higher than the national average (more info can be found on the Jet-Net website).

Reach: 

Between 2002 and 2016 Jet-Net has grown from 5 to 92 associated companies and from 15 to 180 schools. The Jet-Net companies invested a combined total of 6 million euros in Jet-Net programmes. At the moment 60.000 students are reached through the Jet-Net program and 300 teachers are aligned.

Budget and funding model: 

The Jet-Net programme is co-funded by government and industry. It's yearly budget for programme management is EUR 800.000 (co-funded by industry and government). Direct contributions to the programme activities from industry (in cash and in-kind) are estimated to exceed EUR 6 millon per year.

Quote data pages: 

Students enrolled in schools participating in the Dutch Jet-Net programme are 5 - 10% more likely to choose for higher education programmes in STEM compared to the national average.

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